Photo of the day

How have I never heard of the Eshima Ohashi bridge?!  I literally have nightmares exactly about bridges like this.  A common nightmare theme for me is a bridge so steep the car flips over backwards.  Don’t use that against me.

That said, it looks a lot less scary from some other angles.

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Why Democrats should emphasize economics in 2018

Well the horrible Republican tax plan is a good start.  But it’s also a political winner, based on Lee Drutman’s analysis.  Lots of cool stuff in here– charts, etc.,– but I’ll skip to the takeaway:

Their best bet will be to offer a sharper economic message, which offers at least some possibility of gain among Obama-Trump voters and Obama-Other voters, with little risk of alienating Romney-Clinton voters. [emphasis mine]

The Virginia results suggest Democrats still might also be able to expand their base without attempting to reach these voters with a new economic populism — results that will certainly give comfort to the donor class of the party that gets nervous every time Bernie Sanders begins talking. The inevitable pendulum swing against the Republican Party, Mr. Trump’s deep unpopularity, an energized electorate and the wave of Republican congressional retirements — and the slow but steady demographic shift toward a younger, more diverse electorate — will all give Democrats an advantage that they can ride mostly just by being Democrats and not doing stupid things.

Project this trend forward, and perhaps a just-out-of-reach suburban Atlanta House district that a Democratic nominee, Jon Ossoff, narrowly lost this year becomes a narrow Democratic pickup in 2018.

Still, the better bet for Democrats would be to present a sharper economic message, which offers at least some possibility of gain among Obama-Trump voters and Obama-Other voters, with little risk of alienating Romney-Clinton voters.

It’s also better for our politics. The more Democrats rely simply on upscale voters’ cosmopolitan cultural values and corresponding revulsion to Mr. Trump, the more our political system becomes organized around zero-sum culture issues and locked in increasingly no-compromise polarization. Economics, after all, you can bargain over. Identity and culture, not so much. The good news for Democrats is that running on a stronger economic vision is not only good for the country, it’s also good for the Democrats’ long-term fortunes.

No, that doesn’t mean throw gays, Blacks, and women under the bus.  It doesn’t mean changing values here at all.  Nor does it mean that these social issues are unconnected to economic issues.  It does, however, suggest that a winning national strategy will be far more effective by placing an emphasis on clear-cut economic issues, such as the Republicans desire to make the rich richer at the expense of everybody else.

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