The reality of affirmative action in Higher Education

William Ayers‘ with one of the best takes I’ve ever read on the matter:

But here’s the reality: the kind of “who gets in and who doesn’t” arguments about affirmative action and college that the Right wants to fight about don’t have an impact on the broader societal problems we want to solve. If you want to lift families of color out of the cycle of poverty, having a different set of rules about who gets into Harvard or Michigan isn’t the way to do it.

What’s the real barrier? Money.

The vast majority of college students in the United States attend public regional universities. These aren’t the schools that the New York Times writes about, but they are where people actually go. In particular, they are the primary recipients of first-generation students who are the key to altering family trajectories.

These universities don’t have an affirmative action issue. [emphases mine] Most of them accept 90%-95% of their applicants, and those they don’t accept aren’t decided by race but by basic capability factors (generally, high school GPA and ACT or SAT score). The Wright States and Millersvilles and SW Missouri States and Wisconsin-Green Bays of the world will take any and all students they can get who qualify. They are truly race-blind in admissions…

What keeps minority students from attending regional public universities isn’t that they can’t get in. It’s that they can’t afford it. And while there are lots of arguments about what is driving the cost of higher education, for regional publics the primary barrier to affordability has been the long, slow, inexorable march by most state legislatures to defund their higher education systems…

If you believe in higher education as a pathway to success for families of color, this is the battle you need to be fighting. Forget about admissions rules and arguments about whether race can or can’t be included in deciding who gets in to college. If you want to really move the needle on societal equality, and lift millions of disadvantaged people out of the poverty trap, get more public money put into higher education.

I don’t for a minute believe that this is an easy task. But as folks are marshaling political resources for a mostly symbolic battle of little practical significance, I ask them to consider focusing those resources instead on the battle that has the greatest impact on people’s lives. Don’t fall for the bait of arguing about Harvard’s admissions practices. Harvard isn’t going to solve our problems. But more money in public higher education just might.

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About Steve Greene
Professor of Political Science at NC State http://faculty.chass.ncsu.edu/shgreene

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