We have met the enemy… and he doesn’t exist

Kind of a mind-bending post from Bill Ayers.  I kind of love it:

But I want to make a much bigger point here. The point isn’t just that Gov. LePage, or Pastor Burns from South Carolina, were wrong about who our enemies are. The point is that they are both wrong about whether there are any enemies at all.

Put another way: there are no enemies.

I’ll say that again for emphasis: There are no enemies. “Enemies” are an illusion we create ourselves…

People will immediately object, of course. “What about ISIS?”, they will ask. “What about Russia? China? Terrorists? Weren’t the Nazis enemies?” (Because Godwin’s Law).

We live in a culture defined by enemy narratives. Almost all of our stories, our movies, our TV shows revolve around the struggle with enemies, “good guys” vs. “bad guys”, black hats and white hats. There are exceptions, of course, but they are relatively rare. The Enemy Narrative is one of the most recognizable stories we have.

The problem is, it’s all wrong. Or, put another way, it’s all made up – a constructed story we tell ourselves about the world that hides and obscures more than it illuminates. We believe that enemies are real, that they really exist, just like trees and oceans and clouds are real. But they’re not. Enemies are just people with labels we attach to them…

But what about people who attack us? Aren’t they our enemies? If someone tries to do me harm, I’m not making that up – doesn’t that make someone my enemy?

Imagine this story: I go out for the evening with my brother (who would, for the record, never do this…). We have dinner, maybe hear some music, walk to a couple of bars. He’s feeling down about things in his life. Over the course of the evening he drinks too much, thinks about the wrong things too much, grows angry. Soon he’s consumed by his anger and rage, fueled by alcohol. He bumps into someone, starts scuffling. I step in to restrain him, and he turns his anger on me. He lashes out to hit me.

Is he my enemy? Of course not. He’s misguided, confused, and mistaken. Yes, he’s trying to do me harm. But he’s still my brother. And I will respond to him as such…

This is not an argument for complete pacifism (a topic I’ve dealt with previously). If my brother is attacking me, I’m going to resist. I may even use force against him. But because he is my brother, not my enemy, I will use the least force necessary. I will do everything I can to keep him whole and unharmed.

Likewise, if a terrorist group is planning to attack us we should attempt to stop them. But in doing so, we should remember that, however confused or mistaken they may be, they are still fellow human beings. When Jesus called on us to love our enemies, this is exactly what he meant. If you claim to be a Christian and yet want to lash out in anger and hatred at terrorists (or Mexicans, or “thugs”, or anyone else), you’ve got a problem…

Gov. LePage will not be the last politician during this electoral season to label someone else “the enemy”. Partisans on both sides will do so, because the Enemy Narrative is a great way to mobilize your tribe and get them to go out and do things. Every time we do so, we dehumanize each other a little bit more. LePage isn’t the cause of the problem, he’s a symptom.

Good stuff.

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About Steve Greene
Professor of Political Science at NC State http://faculty.chass.ncsu.edu/shgreene

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