Video of the day

This short film has been making the rounds on FB.  After a couple of strong recommenations, I finally realized I need to watch it.  So good.  Take the five minutes.  Seriously.

Advertisements

Photo of the day

Haven’t used the Telegraph animal photos of the week gallery in too long:

Bob the golden retriever is quite possibly the friendliest dog you could ever meet. The cute canine has struck up an unusual friendship with eight birds and a hamster and can be seen in a variety of pictures having fun and relaxing with his pals. Bob lives in São Paulo, Brazil, along with his owner and the eight pet birds.www.facebook.com/bobgold​enretrieverBob the golden retriever is quite possibly the friendliest dog you could ever meet. The cute canine has struck up an unusual friendship with eight birds and a hamster and can be seen in a variety of pictures having fun and relaxing with his pals. Bob lives in São Paulo, Brazil, along with his owner and the eight pet birds. http://www.facebook.com/bobgold​enretrieverPicture: @bob_goldenretriever/REX​ Shutterstock

Incarceration nation

Vox with a great series of charts that summarize the state of mass incarcerration in America.  This one is my favorite, but there’s plenty more really good ones.

less prison no more crime

Another way to gauge the diminishing benefits of prison is by looking at what’s happened in states after they reduced their prison populations in recent years. The data in the chart above, taken from the Pew Charitable Trusts, shows that there’s no correlation between imprisonment rates and crime — suggesting that states can bring down their prison populations without risking public safety in a significant way.

Yup.  So maybe we should do that.  And a whole lot of other stuff.  We do criminal justice policy just so stupidly and ruin so many lives in the process.

Quick hits (part II)

1) Bill Ayers on Greece:

I don’t see a similar discussion with regard to Greece. There is plenty of agreement that the Greeks have borrowed way too much money, and plenty of finger-pointing at them for having done so. But who lent them that money? At what point did those lenders cross the line between responsible and irresponsible lending? The IMF apparently figured out that Greece will never be able to repay all of its debts; where were the other lenders when that calculation should have been done? It’s easy to point fingers as the “lazy” Greeks, but somebody (mostly Germany, by most accounts) lent them the money. What responsibility do lenders have to do their homework and lend responsibly?

2) John Oliver talks and New York listens.  Okay, not really the causal chain, but great to see NY embracing much-needed bail reform.

3) Jimmy Carter is done with oppressing women in the name of Christianity.

4) There’s been a lot of attention in NC to whether magistrates would have to marry same-sex couples.  According to Republicans, to do so would violate their religious freedom.  Now that they can opt out, only 14 of nearly 700 have done so.

5) Not that they can do much but complain, but the Louisiana Supreme Court is not happy about same sex marriage.

6) Seth Masket on why Bernie-mentum is not all its cracked up to be:

This doesn’t mean that Sanders can’t actually make a difference in this contest. He may well win a few important primaries and caucuses, and he may play an important role in the nominating convention next summer. But everything we know about the way presidential nominations work says that Hillary Clinton has a bigger advantage than anyone ever has who wasn’t an incumbent president.

7) Drum points out that not only are we willfully ignorant as a society about GMO food; the same goes for irradiated food.  This could do wonders to reduce food-borne pathogens, but everybody is too freaked out about “radiation!”

8) Baltimore police– not so great even if you are a white Baltimore resident. These guys need to try harder.

9) This is not anything new for the Catholic Church, but it is nice to see Pope Francis state it so plainly:

Francis explained that both scientific theories were not incompatible with the existence of a creator – arguing instead that they “require it”.

“When we read about Creation in Genesis, we run the risk of imagining God was a magician, with a magic wand able to do everything. But that is not so,” Francis said.

10) Really interesting piece on the rising concern over “micro-aggressions” and how this reflects differing views of “moral culture.”

We can better understand complaints about microaggression and the reactions to them if we understand that each side of the debate draws from a different moral culture. Those calling attention to microaggressions have rejected the morality dominant among middle-class Americans during the 20th century — what sociologists and historians have sometimes called a dignity culture, which abhors private vengeance and encourages people to go to the police or use the courts when they are seriously harmed. Less serious offenses might be ignored, and certainly any merely verbal offense should be. Parents thus teach their children to say, “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words can never hurt me.”

Microaggression complaints make clear that this is no longer settled morality. Those who see microaggressions as a serious problem and who bring up minor and unintentional slights reject the idea that words can’t hurt, that slights should be brushed off, that even overt insults should be ignored. This attitude reveals the emergence of a new moral culture, one we call victimhood culture, since it valorizes victimhood.

Put me on the side of dominant middle-class culture.

11) Can’t say I was really all that surprised on the massive failure of American efforts to build schools in Afghanistan, but it is depressing.  And some surprisingly strong reporting in Buzzfeed, of all places.

12) Onion on the pros and cons of flying the confederate flag– pure awesomeness.

13) Just in case you didn’t know, that whole crack babies thing is a myth.  A great example of spurious correlation.

14) Paul Krugman on how Republicans want to bring all the policies of the Greek disaster to America.

15) The piece on autism in the last quick hits led me to this older, but better, look at understanding the rising prevalence of autism (short version: whatever environmental factors contribute, they are a small part).

16) I loved this eulogy for the epistolary email, as it so reflects my own personal experience.

17) New Yorker’s Patrick Radden Keefe on El Chapo’s latest escape.

18) If somebody suggested a story about two sets of identical twins that were switched at birth and raised as two sets of fraternal twins, chances are you would say it is too outlandish to be believed.  But it happened and it’s an amazing story.  It’s long, but I guarantee you won’t regret reading it.

%d bloggers like this: