Where the stuff goes

Okay, I don’t actually have all that much interest in where commodities throughout the US are shipped, but this has to be about the coolest interactive data visualization I have ever seen (via Brookings).  Here’s where all the stuff heading out of Raleigh goes.  And it is definitely cool to look up NYC, Chicago, etc.

stuff

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Where I live

So, my NC State Senate district is gerrymandered heavily Democratic in order to make all the other nearby districts reliably Republican.  Given that no serious Republican had any chance of winning the seat, we got quite the unserious and generally insane candidate, Molotov Mitchell.  I really loved his explanation for why he lost:

“Had we been in a district that hadn’t been drawn up to contain the most hardcore, Birkenstock-wearing, Che Guevara-loving socialists this side of Leningrad, we could have won, too,” he wrote in an email to supporters.

Hey, I’ve never even owned a pair of Birkenstocks (though, I don’t know if my Teva’s count against me).  Though, I have been to Leningrad.

Photo of the day

From the Telegraph’s Animal photos of the week:

An osprey lifts off with a rainbow trout clutched in its talons at the Rothiemurchus fishery in Aviemore, Scotland. The striking photograph was captured by 16-year-old student Samuel Aron from Watford.

An osprey lifts off with a rainbow trout clutched in its talons at the Rothiemurchus fishery in Aviemore, Scotland. The striking photograph was captured by 16-year-old student Samuel Aron from Watford.Picture: Samuel Aron/HotSpot Media

 

The global warming generation gap

So, this is kind of interesting,via Wonkblog.  Sure, not surprising that young people are more likely to want to address climate change (even at the cost of personal sacrifice):

gh1

 

 

But what is encouraging (?) is that even young Republicans have figured out this is a real problem we should do something about and there’s a fairly stark generation gap even among Republicans.

gh2

 

Well, that gives some hope.  That said, it’s still hard to be all that optimistic on the issue.  We are talking about short term, concrete sacrifice now for an uncertain benefit at an uncertain time in the future.  Truth is, best evidence suggests that we very much make this short term sacrifice, but arguing for a concrete cost now for a abstract future benefit is not exactly easy.  Still, encouraging to see that at least when answering a survey question, many Americans are open to that sacrifice.

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