Mini rant of a dead horse

Okay, so much more important stuff to write about, but I cannot resist because this one bugs me so much:

Anyone accessing the popular dating site OKCupid with Firefox today is in for a surprise. Instead of the homepage, OKCupid.com is serving Firefox users with a message calling out Mozilla CEO Brendan Eich for his support of California’s Proposition 8, highlighted by a $1000 donation made in 2008. “Mozilla’s new CEO, Brendan Eich, is an opponent of equal rights for gay couples,” the message tells users. “We would therefore prefer that our users not use Mozilla software to access OkCupid.”

Enough of this.  Corporate CEO’s surely have all sorts of beliefs that would be considered odious to the average liberal.  But somehow gay marriage is the one that we should all be taking collective action on?  Hey look, I feel for gays and think they have the right to get married.  But I’m not going to apologize for feeling more strongly for the poor and oppressed who are truly struggling just to get by every day in a system that is stacked against them.  Do many CEO’s take an Ayn Randian view of the poor in their hammocks?  Surely, but where are all the boycotts for this?  I just wish there were more to on-line active liberalism these days than a seemingly singular obsession with gay marriage.

The clearest evidence of the Yankee infiltration of NC

Not much of a baseball fan these days, but I love this map of favorite baseball team by county for the whole country.  Must admit I was surprised that I’m actually in NY Yankee territory.  But, then again, my hometown of Cary, NC has been referred to as Containment Area for Relocated Yankees.  I guess this is the proof.  Also interesting to see that the Yankees basically fill in gaps where there is no favorite local team.  Lastly, it is sad to me, growing up a NoVA Orioles fan to see that they have been supplanted by the Washington Nationals.  I’ll always be an Orioles fan.

Now That the Baseball Season Is Here, Who’s Your Team ?

Photo of the day

Sadly, the Exxon Valdez is still having an environmental impact 25 years later.  Here’s an In Focus gallery from the spill:

The Exxon Baton Rouge (smaller ship on left) attempts to offload crude oil from the Exxon Valdez after the Valdez ran aground in Prince William sound near Valdez, Alaska, on March 26, 1989. (AP Photo)

The 99.9%

The fact that the really, really rich are the ones who have been so disproportinately benefiting in recent years is not exactly news, but Derek Thompson’s post is about as succinct a summary of the issue as I’ve seen.  This chart is really pretty astounding– it’s not even so great to be in the top 1%.  After that, though…

It turns out that wealth inequality isn’t about the 1 percent v. the 99 percent at all. It’s about the 0.1 percent v. the 99.9 percent (or, really, the 0.01 percent vs. the 99.99 percent, if you like). Long-story-short is that this group, comprised mostly of bankers and CEOs, is riding the stock market to pick up extraordinary investment income. And it’s this investment income, rather than ordinary earned income, that’s creating this extraordinary wealth gap.

Now, I don’t know what the solution to this is, but I’m going to suggest that the status quo in this matter is definitely not a good thing.

Video of the day

Off for a day of family fun.  Entertain yourself with these awesome videos.  Pretty cool to have a dad that is a Pixar animator.  Here’s one:

More here.

How the Republicans saved North Carolina’s economy

Or not.  NC Republicans like to claim that it’s there elimination of pesky environmental regulations, tax cut for the wealthy, cuts to education, etc., that are lowering the states unemployment.  Or, just maybe, we’re following the national cycle (from WSJ)

Hmmm.  Yes, we recovered faster than most states for a while, but that’s because there was more to gain.  But the worst part is we’re not actually creating jobs.  Just people who’ve given up looking for work:

North Carolina led the U.S. in job losses last month, a sign of stress for a state scaling back its support for its jobless residents.

The Tar Heel State shed a seasonally adjusted 11,300 jobs in February from the prior month as it continues to grapple with the decline of its traditional manufacturing, tobacco and textile industries, according to new Labor Department figures released Friday.

Employment increased in 33 states, while it decreased in 17 states and the District of Columbia. Nationwide, payrolls rose 175,000 in February.

North Carolina’s unemployment rate fell 0.3 percentage point to 6.4%, one the nation’s largest declines, though the fall was primarily the result of a shrinking labor force. The number of people either working or looking for work declined by 64,000 people from February 2013, according to data from the North Carolina Department of Commerce.

Spin all you want, but less North Carolinians working– regardless of the unemployment rate– is not a good thing for the state economy.

 

Photo of the day

Really loved the gallery I linked to yesterday.  Here’s another:

The courtship of white storks on their nest near Biebesheim am Rhein, western Germany
The courtship of white storks on their nest near Biebesheim am Rhein, western GermanyPicture: AFP/GETTY
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